Review: “Star Wars: Moving Target” by Cecil Castellucci & Jason Fry

Title: Moving Target
Authors: Cecil Castellucci & Jason Fry
Series: Star Wars (Official Canon)
Rating: ****
Publisher/Copyright: Disney Press, 2015

Third time’s the charm! Moving Target is the third of three YA novels featuring the “big three” protagonists from the original trilogy, set in that era but seeding elements from the upcoming film. This time we catch up with Leia in between The Empire Strikes Back and Return Of The Jedi as the Rebellion first learns of the existence of the second Death Star.

The Empire is rebuilding the Death Star. Once completed, it will essentially spell the end of the Rebellion, as any world that causes problems can be threatened with Alderaan’s fate. In order to buy time to assemble the fleet without the Empire noticing, Leia heads a decoy mission, drawing the Empire’s attention to the other side of the galaxy with a false recruiting mission. But such a course of action is dangerous, both for her team and for the various rebellious types responding to her beacons for a rendezvous that will never happen. Both Leia and the other members of her team are going to have to decide for themselves just what they are willing to sacrifice for the good of the Rebellion….

Whereas Smuggler’s Run and The Weapon Of A Jedi  served up lighthearted adventures with our favorite protagonists, Moving Target takes a slightly weightier approach. Throughout the book, Leia struggles with the idea of sacrifice, both how the rank and file of the Rebellion seem willing to sacrifice themselves to protect her and how her decoy mission threatens to make unwitting sacrifices of anyone responding to their spurious recruitment mission. During wartime, tough decisions have to be made…but does that truly justify the sacrifice of innocents, even to ensure the survival of the Rebellion? It’s not a question that has a concrete answer, and the authors don’t insult us by pretending it does. In the end, each of our characters are going to have to decide for themselves just what they’re willing to do in the name of freedom’s cause. The characterization was all spot-on, though it was occasionally odd to have Nien Nunb’s dialogue directly translated to English Basic. I get it, of course, its just slightly jarring given his only onscreen dialogue is in Sullustan. The authors seem to be trying to make up for the fact that most of the onscreen Rebels are human in the original films, populating Leia’s strike force with a Cerean (like Ki-Adi Mundi from the prequels), an Abednedo (like X-Wing pilot Ello Asty from the new film) and a Dressellian (like Orrimaarko, “Prune Face” from the original Return Of The Jedi action figure line. Yes, that was the character’s name for quite a while….), which is a welcome effort. Disney seems to be taking steps to make the Star Wars universe more diverse than traditionally seen, and I for one am not complaining. On the whole, this was a good book and a decent addition to the series.

CONTENT: Mild violence, including a discussion of torture. No profanity. No real sexual content.

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Filed under Books, Novels, Reviews, Star Wars

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